When you use a rear flank cinch to secure the rear of your trail saddle, it should be snug (not tight) against the horse. A rule of thumb is to be able to slip two fingers between the flank and the horse at the apex of the belly.

It should not be loose or hang below the horse’s belly – a loose flank cinch is a danger to horse and rider. Not only could your horse get a rear leg caught if he’s kicking at a fly, but also brush or other hazards could get caught between the flank and your horse as you’re traveling through rough terrain.

Snap the hobble strap that is attached to the body of the flank to the dee on the center of your cinch. This keeps the flank cinch in place and prevents it from becoming a bucking strap – the unexpected movement could cause your quiet trail horse to react like a genuine saddle bronc.
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Could your horse use a little more comfort when you cinch him up? Check out these tips.